Youth Violence

What We Can Learn from Listening to Killers

bulletOn-Demand Training

bulletRecorded on May 12, 2016

bullet2 Hours

bulletFREE for YIPA members

bullet$40 for non-YIPA members

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One of the important developmental starting points in understanding violence is that physical aggression is essentially universal in infants (and equally so for males and females). This presentation provides you with a unique opportunity to hear Dr. James Garbarino, a leader in the field of youth development and trauma, share his perspective as a leading expert psychological witness. His insights are informed by having actually listened to many young people who have committed lethal violence. With so many youth we work with experiencing trauma, Dr. Garabino will be providing a perspective that can only enhance our understanding and skills as youth workers.

He sees early trauma as creating the risk that this early aggression exhibited in infants and very young children will coalesce into violent behavior in adolescence. If no intervention occurs, this pattern of childhood conduct disorder becomes the entryway into adolescent delinquent and antisocial violent behavior.

The experience of abuse sets the child up for the kind of “risky thinking” that leads to chronic patterns of aggression, bad behavior, acting out and violating the rights of others that can lead to a diagnosis of “conduct disorder.” The keys to the socialization of early aggression are “cognitive structuring” (the ideas about aggression) and “behavioral rehearsal” (practice with aggressive behavior). The more socially toxic (and traumatic) the environment in which childhood and adolescence occur, the more likely it is that childhood conduct disorder will translate into adolescent violence.

Chronic trauma, particularly in early childhood, constitutes a frontal assault on the process of becoming a human being. It has important consequences for “executive function” and “affective regulation,” which are the cornerstones of positive and competent social behavior. Trauma has a developmental impact.

The presentation is based upon the author’s books Lost Boys (NY: Free Press, 1999) and Listening to Killers (Berkley, CA: University of California Press, 2015).

Learning Objectives

  • Understanding the key elements of trauma
  • Understanding the impact of socially toxic environments on high risk kids
  • Understanding the impact of trauma upon the developmental pathway of adolescents

Presenter

Dr. James Garbarino is Emeritus Professor of Human Development at Cornell University. He currently holds the Maude C. Clarke Chair in Humanistic Psychology and was the founding Director of the Center for the Human Rights of Children at Loyola University in Chicago.  He earned his B.A. from St. Lawrence University in 1968 and his Ph.D. in Human Development and Family Studies from Cornell University in 1973. He is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association.

Dr. Garbarino has served as consultant or advisor to a wide range of organizations, including the National Committee to Prevent Child Abuse, the National Institute for Mental Health, the American Medical Association, the National Black Child Development Institute, the National Science Foundation, the U.S. Advisory Board on Child Abuse and Neglect, and the FBI. He also in 1991 undertook missions for UNICEF to assess the impact of the Gulf War upon children in Kuwait and Iraq. He has also served as a consultant for programs serving Vietnamese, Bosnian and Croatian child refugees.

Dr. Garbarino is a long-time leader in the field of youth development and trauma. He was awarded the first C. Henry Kempe Award by The National Conference on Child Abuse and Neglect in 1985 in recognition of his efforts on behalf of abused and neglected children. Other awards and recognitions include the President’s Celebrating Success Award from the National Association of School Psychologists (2000), Outstanding Service to Children Award from the Chicago Association for the Education of Young Children (2003), and the Max Hayman Award from the American Orthopsychiatric Association for contributions to the prevention of genocide (2011). Most recently, in 2015, he received the Rosenberry Award from Colorado Children’s Hospital in Denver for his work in advancing clinical insight into children and youth.

Focus Area


Each of YIPA’s trainings are designed around MyYouthPro’s Competency Framework. The competency focus of this training is: BEHAVIORAL INTERVENTION

Logistics

  • Online Training
    • Recorded on May 12, 2016
  • 2 Hours
  • FREE for YIPA members
  • $40 for non-YIPA members
  • Not a member? Annual memberships are only $99 for individuals and only $250 for organizations. Click here to join or learn more.
  • This training will count as 2 CEU hours for most boards. Please contact your board directly with questions on submitting.

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